Aside

Apologies

My apologies for the recent lack of posts and updates, I was seriously ill last month and am currently convalescing. I plan to begin adding material again sometime next month, but until then, be well, be at peace, and be free from fear.

Regards
Andy

Why Theravada Buddhism is my Path.

Tags

, , , ,

The Wheel of Dhamma

The Wheel of Dhamma

I came to Theravada Buddhism very slowly. Over the last 25 years or so I have investigated Wicca, the occult Western Tradition (The Golden Dawn etc.), I have investigated Aleister Crowley‘s Thelema, I have investigated Christianity quite heavily in many of its guises (both Protestant and Catholic), and I had a brief, yet wholly unproductive flirtation with Islam. I must admit the Koran, in English, is painfully unreadable but maybe that is just me.

 

Reiki

Reiki

Reiki

For some reason I never considered Buddhism as an avenue to look into until I came across the Japanese complementary therapy known as Reiki. Back in 2010 I was made redundant whilst diagnosed with severe depression and stress anxiety. Being made redundant did those conditions no favours and the medication I am on did not seem to be working too well so I started looking at the alternative market for something to try. My investigations lead me to Reiki. It is a Japanese form of hands on energy therapy that can be used to aid in the healing of almost anything. What surprised me was the founder, Mikao Usui, had Buddhist training and had used Buddhist techniques in developing his methods of assisting in the healing of various ills, including mental problems. Continue reading

Crossing the Flood

Tags

, ,

Flood

Flood

A short and simple Sutta is now provided that teaches gentleness in your practice. Do not stop during difficulty, but do not strain at the leash. Progress is made by steady effort only.

This is the Ogha­taraṇa­sutta, the Sutta appears in the Samyutta Nikaya, and in English it is called ‘Crossing the Flood’.

 

Saṃyutta Nikāya 1.1

The Connected Discourses with Devatas

Crossing the Flood

Thus have I heard. On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Savatthi in Jeta’s Grove, Anathapiṇḍika’s Park. Then, when the night had advanced, a certain devatā of stunning beauty, illuminating the entire Jeta’s Grove, approached the Blessed One. Having approached, he paid homage to the Blessed One, stood to one side, and said to him:

“How, dear sir, did you cross the flood?”

“By not halting, friend, and by not straining I crossed the flood.”

“But how is it, dear sir, that by not halting and by not straining you crossed the flood?”

“When I came to a standstill, friend, then I sank; but when I struggled, then I got swept away. It is in this way, friend, that by not halting and by not straining I crossed the flood.”

The devatā:

“After a long time at last I see
A brahmin who is fully quenched,
Who by not halting, not straining,
Has crossed over attachment to the world.”

This is what that devatā said. The Teacher approved. Then that devatā, thinking, “The Teacher has approved of me,” paid homage to the Blessed One and, keeping him on the right, disappeared right there.

Source: Sutta Central

Meditation on the Breath: or The Mindfulness of Breathing

Tags

, , ,

Mindfulness of Breathing

Mindfulness of Breathing

Meditation on the Breath, or The Mindfulness of Breathing is a main stay of Buddhist meditation. It can be used in so many ways. Your mind calms, your body relaxes and you come to know peace in a way that is not usual in the West.

Breath meditation can be used anywhere, while sitting watching the T.V., whilst walking to the shops, even whilst standing in the queue in the shop. Whenever you have a chance to pause and take time out, breath meditation can come to your aid, and calm you down. It really isn’t complicated at all, as the following instructions will show. Just 15 minutes or half an hour a day, when you can grab it, can make an enormous impact on you day-to-day wellbeing. Continue reading

Starting Out Small – by Ajahn Lee

Tags

, ,

Meditation

Meditation

This small booklet contains 13 talks by the Venerable Ajahn Lee on meditation for beginners. It has been translated from Thai by the Venerable Thanissaro Bhikkhu of Dhamma Talks, and to quote his page directly:

Starting Out Small: A Collection of Talks for Beginning Meditators, by Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo. (revised & expanded September 5, 2016) In this collection of talks Ajaan Lee covers the sorts of questions that occur to people new to meditation—Why meditate? How should I meditate? And why in that particular way?—and in his own style he provided not only straightforward answers to these questions but also vivid analogies.

Earlier in 2016 this book was expanded with two new talks that had never been published before—“Merit” and “On Target”—along with complete translations of the talks “The Art of Letting Go” and “At the Tip of Your Nose.”

With the newest edition, Starting Out Small now includes another section of newly translated Dhamma talks, featuring one of Ajaan Lee’s longest recorded sermons, “Recollection of Virtue.”

This is an excellent guide for the beginning meditator. Ajahn Lee is lucid and to the point. I highly recommend this text. It will be made available in the eLibrary per usual.

It is released under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ license and thus can be distributed so long as it is not sold.

PDF Download
Starting Out Small: A Collection of Talks for Beginning Meditators.

May all beings live without fear!